sake

Americans Love Pairing Sake With Sushi, But It’s a Big Mistake

Americans Love Pairing Sake With Sushi, But It’s a Big Mistake

Sake is having a moment in the U.S. We are currently Japan’s largest export market for its traditional rice beverage, sipping nearly 5,000 kiloliters per year. Small wine shops sell unfiltered nigori sake alongside hipster varietal wines. Restaurants like Oberlin in Providence, R.I., Catbird Seat in Nashville, and Banyan in Boston, pair sake by the glass with […]

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The Secret to Reading Sake Labels

The Secret to Reading Sake Labels

Sake is often misunderstood. To many Americans, the Japanese beverage is only consumed hot or dropped into a beer after pounding the table and yelling, “When you say sake I say bomb! Sake! Bomb!” That’s starting to change. Restaurants in major cities are increasingly featuring sake menus with a range of options.

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Sake Is Emerging From the Shadow of the Sushi Bar

Sake Is Emerging From the Shadow of the Sushi Bar

For years Americans only knew sake in cheaply mass-produced iterations. We dropped shots of it into pints of Kirin, screaming “sake bomb!” to no one in particular; or sipped hot, boozy versions in strip-mall sushi joints. The latter comprised my introduction to the category. As a college undergraduate I went to dinner with a roommate’s […]

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How to Decode a Sake List

How to Decode a Sake List

The first sake I ever had was in a Japanese restaurant in Maine. It was served warm and was unlike anything I’d had before – not really beer, not really wine – but so complementary to the rice and fish it accompanied. Outside major cities, the sake selection at most restaurants is limited to bottles […]

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Myth Busted: Sake Isn’t Wine

Myth Busted: Sake Isn’t Wine

For a drink that’s so very everywhere, sake’s pretty misunderstood. And unless you’ve grown up with the stuff—or become one of a few certified sake sommeliers—it actually makes sense to not quite get it. As consumers, we’ve been sold a two-dimensional sake experience: hot or cold, served with sushi, and, yeah, that’s pretty much it.

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