When it comes to tech, there are few conflicts more hotly debated than that of the Apple iPhone versus the Samsung Galaxy; Galaxy users argue the merits of their camera quality, while Apple loyalists love the brand’s prestige. No matter which tech giant you prefer, however, the two rivals have certainly garnered attention and intrigue worldwide, with the stories around some of their most popular products becoming a source of interest for the tech community and laypeople alike.

While Apple’s origin story is perhaps more interesting than how the iPhone got its name (that “i” mostly standing for internet, but also for individual, instruct, inform, and inspire), the story behind the name of Samsung’s leading device has largely been a mystery — even to those in the know.

Though many have assumed the name Galaxy was chosen simply due to its high-tech, futuristic appeal, there’s actually more to the name than you may think — and the story begins with a bottle of wine.

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According to Geoffrey Cain, author of “Samsung Rising,” the brand wasn’t named after the stars. Though Samsung has never shared its origin story publicly, the brand’s former senior vice president, Ed Ho, told Cain over coffee that the Galaxy was named after a Terlato Wines bottle often enjoyed by high-level Samsung executives. The wine in question, named Galaxy, is a $95 red blend made from California Merlot, Syrah, and Cabernet Sauvignon. The execs used the wine as inspiration for the phone’s name, noting the word galaxy’s “premium ring,” Cain writes.

And Galaxy’s affiliation with wine goes beyond its name. The brand’s “Premier” users also have exclusive access to food and wine takeout from select Michelin Star restaurants, and the Galaxy Gear smartwatch comes preloaded with Vivino – an app that allows users to see and share wine reviews by taking a picture of a bottle’s label.

So the next time you partake in an iPhone versus Galaxy debate, remember that you’re comparing Apples to oranges grapes.