Can You Buy Alcohol on New Year's Day and New Year's Eve In Your State?

The new year is finally here. It’s time to wash away the good, the bad, and the questionable choices of the past 12 months with some well-deserved drinks. This year might be the one where you need a couple of extra drinks to cheers a fresh start. Or maybe you just want to get your fill before you start your January detox. Either way, New Year’s Eve (and subsequently New Year’s Day, the de facto Bloody Mary day), is a time of consumption.

But what if you run out of the good stuff before the party’s over? You can just hit the store, right? It’s complicated, as they say. It turns out that your ability to buy alcohol on New Year’s depends on where you live.

Check out the chart below to see if you can legally buy alcohol to take home in your state on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

State Alcohol? Notes
Alabama Some State-owned liquor stores closed on New Year’s Day or the day it’s government-recognized. Also closed on Sunday.
Alaska Yes
Arizona Yes
Arkansas Yes
California Yes
Colorado Yes
Connecticut Yes No on New Year’s Day. Some counties prohibit sale when it falls on a Sunday.
Delaware Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on Sunday.
Florida Yes
Georgia Yes
Hawaii Yes
Idaho Some No liquor from state-run liquor stores when the government recognizes New Year’s Day.
Indiana Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on Sunday.
Iowa Yes
Kansas Yes No wine or liquor from state-owned liquor stores when New Year’s Day is recognized.
Kentucky Yes Kentucky has many dry counties.
Louisiana Yes
Maine Yes
Maryland Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when Baltimore and Garrett counties prohibit liquor sales.
Massachusetts Yes
Michigan Yes
Minnesota Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores.
Mississippi Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores.
Missouri Yes
Montana Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores.
Nebraska Yes
Nevada Yes
New Hampshire Yes Except for liquor at government-run stores on New Year’s Day.
New Jersey Yes
New Mexico Yes
New York Yes
North Carolina Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor from government-run stores.
North Dakota Yes
Ohio Yes
Oklahoma Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday.
Oregon Yes
Pennsylvania Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores.
Rhode Island Yes
South Carolina Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor from government-run stores.
South Dakota Yes
Tennessee Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine.
Texas Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor.
Utah Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday, when you can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores. Also can’t buy liquor or wine from government-run stores on the recognized New Year’s Day holiday.
Vermont Yes Yes on New Year’s Eve, no liquor sales from government-run stores on recognized New Year’s Day.
Virginia Yes On New Year’s Eve, no liquor sales from government-run stores on recognized New Year’s Day.
Washington Yes
West Virginia Yes Except when New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day is on a Sunday when you can’t buy liquor.
Wisconsin Yes
Wyoming Yes