Beehive State residents and visitors may soon be able to once again purchase miniature bottles across retail locations in Utah.

The 50-millimeter miniature spirits bottles have long been missed from state-controlled liquor stores, according to the Associated Press. Known for its tight connection between the state government and the temperate Church of Latter Day Saints, the western state hasn’t permitted miniature bottles for over thirty years.

Utah’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Services Commission approved the measure in a July 26 unanimous vote, Fox 13 reports. Under this new regulation, both previously-banned 50-millimeter liquor bottles and 187-milliliter wine bottles will be available for purchase.

In the state, all liquor store sales are overseen by the state government. Only state liquor stores are permitted to sell spirits and wine, according to the Associated Press.

Utah has a long and somewhat complicated history with liquor sales, as Salt Lake Magazine’s timeline illustrates. In 1969, mini 1.75-ounce bottles were legalized in an effort by lawmakers to curb drinking from larger containers.

In 1990, the “Barbie Bottles” were banned statewide, sans for airplane drink service, in a move to also crack down on cocktails containing more than one ounce of spirits. At the same time, the state also forbade bars from participating in happy hour drink specials.

If the July 2022 proposed measure passes public comment without major concern, miniature bottles of Bacardi, Absolut, and other popular liquors could be available for purchase in Utah bottle shops as early as this fall.

In addition to bottled liquors, Utah’s alcohol regulations are remarkably tight in on-premise consumption as well. Per state law, restaurant diners must order a meal or other food item when enjoying an alcoholic beverage. This updated mini bottle regulation might help to open the state to increased tourism opportunities.